Author Post
Topic Should I continue in the CFA program?
Marcel
@2019-08-08 11:26:34
I took Level 1 in June and I passed. I was finishing up my last semester of college earlier this year which allowed me ample study time. I started my first job this Monday, and after getting a feel for a 60+ hour work week, I cannot fathom putting in the time to prepare for Level 2. I know it's possible, however my weekends are too valuable at this point. I'll eventually get accustomed to long hours and probably start studying, but it's simply impossible to think about at this point. How the hell do you people do it?
cygnus
@2019-08-13 12:46:22
get an early start(november) with 10 hour a week, 3 days workweek for 90 minutes, and 3 hrs each day on weekends, by end of first quater 10 you would have probably gone through cfai readings...by then you should feel more motivated to do more for fear of wasting time already spent and would have plenty of time to go over los statements and do practice questions for real exam. IF you are just starting 60 hour work week you have plenty of time to get you to used to workload and how to manage time before hitting the books in november. think of cfa as hobby and start early and pace yourself.
aclipse35
@2019-08-20 16:35:47
Its not going to get easier once you get married and have kids and have real bills... I did the CFP(r) last summer with a 3 y/o that is special needs and pregnant wife... let me tell you that sucked... can't imagine doing the CFA in the same situation
0is4eva
@2020-01-11 16:15:34
Why is everyone working a 60+ hour week? What happened to the 40+ hour week? /And in France: 35+./ I assume employer's Nirvana will be reached if all the workers work 120 hour weeks and sleep on a mattress under their desks...

In any case...

Studying while at a new job might be quite difficult, and if it's your first job after college even more so. Why not put everything off until, say, November and then decide depending on the outlook of things? If it's your first job I assume it might very well be some horrible entry-level job where they make you work hard. It might become easier later on, new opportunities might develop along the way or you may be in a position to work fewer hours and so make room for the studying required for Level II. Also: You might take it in two steps (which will cost you a little bit more). You get hold of the Level II books (one way or the other) and study part of the curriculum this year. Next year you sign up with the institute and aim for the Level II exam in 2016. One year more or less will not make a big difference.